Foundation sponsors 20 students at the Nepal School in honor of the 20th anniversary of the Nepal School

In honor of the  20th year of the Sankhu Palubari Community School, The Emily Sandall Foundation will be sponsoring  20 students to attend the school.

The Sankhu-Palubari Community School (SPCS) in Nepal provides a free education — from pre-K through grade 10 — to the neediest children in this rural Kathmandu Valley area. Founded by The Advocates for Human Rights and operated in partnership with Educate the Children-Nepal and the local community, the school gives a genuine alternative to child labor and a brighter future.

The SPCS curriculum includes Nepali, English, grammar, math, science, and social studies. Extracurricular opportunities include poetry, art, music, Nepali dance, speech, and sports. Students also learn the fundamental principles of human rights through “Alfulai Chinau,” a human rights curriculum developed especially for the school. The school also provides a daily meal, health checks, and immunizations for all students.

The Need
An estimated 2.6 million Nepali children between the ages of 5 and 14 are child laborers. Children work in in dangerous conditions in brickyards, carpet factories, and quarries, or in agricultural and domestic work. Nepali children are also vulnerable to being trafficked to India.

Because Nepali public schools generally charge administrative fees and fees for books, exams, and uniforms, struggling families like those in the Sankhu-Palubari community cannot afford to educate their children. (When the school opened in 1999, more than 50 percent of the 10,000 of the community’s residents were unemployed.) Uneducated and illiterate, children grow up to be impoverished adults, continuing the cycle of poverty.

Many students are members of Nepal’s most marginalized indigenous groups and lower castes — such as the Dalit — who might otherwise be forced to work. SPCS promotes equal access to education for low-income families, and welcomes children regardless of caste, ethnicity, or gender.

Another SPCS focus is supporting girl students so that they stay in school. Currently, more than 50 percent of students at SPCS are girls, a huge gain in the percentage in place when the school first opened. The school has made remarkable strides towards gender parity in a country where education of girls is often not valued equally with education of boys.

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Foundation donates to the Center for Music by People with Disabilities in Missoula

The Emily Sandall Foundation will once again support the work of the Center for Music by People with Disabilities (CMPD), through summer music and dance programs for disabled adults at Opportunity Resources, Inc. (ORI) in Missoula, Montana. Tarn Ream and Roger Moquin offer open African music and dance sessions to everyone in the ORI building, sometimes drawing up to 30 people who join in singing, playing drums and other instruments, and participating in creative movement activities. Due to the nature of this continuing program, the participants are always excited to see Tarn and Roger, often requesting specific songs and movement, happy to learn something new, and always asking when they will be back!

CMPD is a 501 (c) 3 organization, with 509 (a) (2) status, and a mission statement that sums the work nicely: “striving to make music-related activities – music learning, music making, composing, performing, and recording – accessible to children, teenagers, and adults with disabilities in the county of Missoula so that the vision of Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 of full inclusion of people with disabilities in the educational, social, and cultural life of the community can be transformed into a reality.

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Sandall Family donates to the Bellingham Food Bank in Emily’s honor

In honor of Emily and the New Year, the Sandall Family donated two frozen turkeys to the Bellingham Food Bank.The turkeys traveled in the back seat with their seat belt on. The guy at the food bank got a good laugh about that. Wouldn’t Emily love that story!

“Nearly 20% of our city visits our food bank on a regular basis. More than 50% of the people who come to our food bank are kids or senior citizens. We are one of the busiest food banks in Western Washington—visited by more than 1,350 Bellingham families every week.” Bellingham Food Bank

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Happy holidays and thank you to our Foundation community

Happy Holidays to our Foundation community.
Hoping for peaceful holidays for all.Thank you for your incredible kindness to our family

and love for Emily.It truly means so much to us.

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Nepali hats donated to Giving Circle’s Homeless Teens in honor of Emily on the 12th year Anniversary

In honor of Emily on the 12th year, The Sandall Family will donate 12 Nepali wool hats to the Giving Circle for 12 students to keep warm this
winter.
These children, identified as unaccompanied homeless teenagers, do not live with a parent or guardian but are enrolled in the Bellingham School District. Due to their age and because they have no parent or guardian, they are not eligible for many community services.

The Bellingham Giving Circle is a local non-profit with a mission to support the needs of these homeless kids in order for them to stay in school.
Wouldn’t Emily love this idea?!

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